Man behind wire sculptures seeks to leave mark on city he loves

0


The man behind wire sculptures hung on Baltimore City traffic light wires wants to leave his mark on the city he loves.From characters like SpongeBob SquarePants and Bart Simpson, to positive messages, it’s hard to miss the sculptures on Washington Boulevard and elsewhere around the city.The artist behind them, who goes by “REED bmore,” said he wants people to recognize his art, but he does not want people to recognize his face.”I just more so want people to more so connect with the art instead of seeing me as a person,” REED bmore said.REED bmore said he dreamed of creating art when he was 6 years old. He started hanging his wire sculptures around the city in 2014 as a way to connect with people during a dark time in his life.”I just didn’t feel I had the connection to people in the community, isolating myself. So, putting it up and making the decision to do public art was more so just a cry to figure out where my placement is in life and try to find connection,” REED bmore said.He admitted he never got the city’s permission to hang the sculptures but said he does it to make people smile — and several of his sculptures have been hanging for years.”The reaction I would want to elicit is something positive,” REED bmore said. “When I gravitate towards pop culture and characters like that, it’s more of just trying to make that jump connecting from person to person.”REED bmore has connected with quite a few people with more than 14,000 followers on Instagram that shows pictures of his wire sculptures. But REED bmore hopes people will see his art in person, hanging along Baltimore’s streets, and that it will make them smile.

The man behind wire sculptures hung on Baltimore City traffic light wires wants to leave his mark on the city he loves.

From characters like SpongeBob SquarePants and Bart Simpson, to positive messages, it’s hard to miss the sculptures on Washington Boulevard and elsewhere around the city.

The artist behind them, who goes by “REED bmore,” said he wants people to recognize his art, but he does not want people to recognize his face.

“I just more so want people to more so connect with the art instead of seeing me as a person,” REED bmore said.

REED bmore said he dreamed of creating art when he was 6 years old. He started hanging his wire sculptures around the city in 2014 as a way to connect with people during a dark time in his life.

“I just didn’t feel I had the connection to people in the community, isolating myself. So, putting it up and making the decision to do public art was more so just a cry to figure out where my placement is in life and try to find connection,” REED bmore said.

He admitted he never got the city’s permission to hang the sculptures but said he does it to make people smile — and several of his sculptures have been hanging for years.

“The reaction I would want to elicit is something positive,” REED bmore said. “When I gravitate towards pop culture and characters like that, it’s more of just trying to make that jump connecting from person to person.”

REED bmore has connected with quite a few people with more than 14,000 followers on Instagram that shows pictures of his wire sculptures. But REED bmore hopes people will see his art in person, hanging along Baltimore’s streets, and that it will make them smile.





Source link

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More